Monday, December 23, 2019

Milwaukee Public Museum

Trolley Car entrance to the Streets of Old Milwaukee @Milwaukee Public Museum

On a recent visit to Milwaukee, WI our local science center memberships allowed us free entry into the Milwaukee Public Museum. We had a half day before our return flight home and this made for a fun way to spend a couple of hours. 
One of the most unique areas in this museum was Streets of Old Milwaukee complete with a little candy shop for buying reasonably priced treats both modern and reminiscent of days gone by. Another unique area was the European Village where each cottage reveals a display representing a country in Europe. It seems that every European country was represented.
Additionally, this Milwaukee Public Museum has a large natural history component with a diversity of taxidermy in various displays, a creative geologic display area and prehistoric dioramas. 
If you travel and enjoy museums, I highly recommend a membership to your local science center assuming it is a member of the Association of Science and Technology Centers. The membership cost quickly pays for itself.
Old bicycle photo prop @Milwaukee Public Museum
Interior of an old Milwaukee store @Milwaukee Public Museum.

Streets of Old Milwaukee @Milwaukiee Public Museum
European Village @Milwaukee Public Museum
Dinosaur display @Milwaukee Public Museum
Geologic Area @Milwaukee Public Museum
Taxidermy avian display @ Milwaukee Public Museum

Other Museums in the ASTC Passport Program:

Monday, October 21, 2019

Adverb Inspired Poetry

Slowly 

Slowly the tide creeps up the sand,
Slowly the shadows cross the land.
Slowly the cart-horse pulls his mile,
Slowly the old man mounts his stile.

Slowly the hands move round the clock,
Slowly the dew dries on the dock.
Slow is the snail – but slowest of all
The green moss spreads on the old brick wall.
- James Reeves

In our Language studies, we recently took a look at the poem "Slowly" by James Reeves shown above. We discussed how the adverb slowly accurately describes the action of each line and analyzed the rhyming pattern. I then challenged my students to choose a different adverb and come up with a poem with a similar rhyming pattern. This is what Elisabeth came up with:

Quickly 

Quickly, the car zooms past
“Quickly!” says the cast
Quickly, the years go by
Quickly, they say, "Hi"

Quickly, in the race they run
Quickly, travels the light of the sun
Quick! The small child wishes life would go
But so little do they know.  - Elisabeth Davis (copyright 2019)